Sudeep Chakravarti [epub or PDF] Red Sun By Sudeep Chakravarti



10 thoughts on “Red Sun By Sudeep Chakravarti

  1. says:

    A surprisingly well written and well researched account on the subjectThe book starts with some detailed maps and statistics regarding the people’s war movement in India and ends with the urban perspective plan 2004 of CPI Maoist attached as an appendix The amount of organisation and how widespread the movement is is both revealing and scaryA travelogue rather than a history as the author himself claims bu

  2. says:

    very balanced book on the naxalite movement in india It traces the roots of the maoist insurgency in india as well as their ideology The author has some very interesting if not frightening conclusions about the conseuence of such a revolution to the state the idea of 'In Landcity' states surrounded by ' Out land' areas does not seem so outlandish given the way things are going More than any other book this book really ma

  3. says:

    Red Sun Sudeep ChakaravartiNaxalbari has not died and it will never die – Charu MujumdarNaxalism is one of the most debated controve

  4. says:

    Middle class India is snug in the belief that India's primary security threats are terrorism emanating from Pakistan and aggressive designs on our territory by the Chinese This book argues that Left Wing Extremism in the form of Maoism aka Naxalism is actually the greatest internal security challenge that India faces However the author puts it in perspective with the following words Maoism is NOT our greatest internal security threat Povert

  5. says:

    Red Sun is a travelogue and should not be mistaken as a purely academic foray into Naxalism Sudeep Chakravarti has written a fabulous account

  6. says:

    Brave repetitive dry thought provoking and sometimes incoherent The author talks of his travels thru areas infested with Naxalism Talks with both rural and urban ideologues police officers etc get repetitiveI liked narration style of Rahul Pandita 's books Hello Bastar The Untold Story of India's Maoist Movement and The Absent State Insurge

  7. says:

    Would have liked background on CPIMaoist

  8. says:

    If you want to understand the history and practice of the Maoist revolution in India try Hello Bastar or Arundhati Roy's

  9. says:

    Red Sun Sudeep ChakravartiRed Sun Travels in Naxalite country is a great travelogue in a true sense as the title suggests The uniuenes

  10. says:

    The book portrays an unbiased view of the issue of naxalism A travelogue primarily the book captures the thoughts of the author as he visits and subseuently introspects trying to make sense of what he sees and he

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FREE READ Ì MZINES.CO.UK ´ Sudeep Chakravarti

Nter strikes by the Maoists interchangeably known as the Naxalites and police and paramilitary forces In this disturbing examination of the 'Other India' Sudeep Chakravarti combines political history extensive interviews and individual case histories as he travels to the heart of Maoist zones in the country Chhattisgarh home to the controversial state sponsored Salwa Judum programme to contain Naxalism Jharkhand West Bengal Karnataka and Andhra Pradesh where a. Middle class India is snug in the belief that India s primary security threats are terrorism emanating from Pakistan and aggressive designs on our territory by the Chinese This book argues that Left Wing Extremism in the form of Maoism aka Naxalism is actually the greatest internal security challenge that India faces However the author puts it in perspective with the following words Maoism is NOT our greatest internal security threat Poverty non governance bad justice and corruption are Maoist presence in a third of our country merely mirrors our failings as a nation In fact as the book shows many in the Administration intelligence and the army also agree with this conclusion Unfortunately there seems to be no easy way to bring good governance lack of corruption and good justice to our land Still this book is an important contribution because it shows middle India a glimpse of the Maoist threat from the viewpoint of the tribal poor who have been largely ignored during the past twenty five years of shining India It is an effective counter point to the view of Maoism as just terrorism isolated to some forested corners of IndiaThe book is in five sections Section one deals with the author s foray into Chattisgarh which faces the biggest Maoist challenge today Bastar district is in the eye of the storm and the author says it is a no brainer because the region has seen no development since the British times and practically everyone in Govt is corrupt and involved in the liuor business and the smuggling of sagun trees The State machinery has responded to Maoist violence here with its own violence through a movement called Salwa Judum purification hunt Though the State govt touts it as a popular uprising of the masses against the extortionist excess of the Maoists the author characterizes Salwa Judum as follows it is part imagination part administration part intimidation part corruptiona legitimate grouse of a section of the tribal population of Chattisgarh protesting Maoist heavy handedness had been used by the state administration to support and fund a cynical deadly and socially destructive mechanism to counter rebellion with little regard to human life and rights In section two we get to meet current Maoist activists and get appraised of their approach to seizing power eventually in Delhi We get to meet Abhijit Mazumdar son of the legendary Charu Mazumdar the founder of the Maoist movement in India in 1967 as well as Charu Mazumdar s comrade Kanu Sanyal Unfortunately the rhetoric that comes out of the two stalwarts seems painfully familiar and unchanged as it has been over the past fifty years As before the movement itself is racked by perennial divisions and internecine violence due to its inherent intolerance towards dissentIn section three we see the author having an extensive exchange of views with Varavara Rao another famous Maoist There is an evaluation of the success of the Maoists in Nepal in winning power within fifteen years of the onset of the movement The author says that the success of Maoists in Nepal sends a disturbing message to the marginalized and the poor in Nepal India and elsewhere that unless you commit violent acts the state and the privileged won t care about you In this section the author gives his own views of what it would be like if ever left wing revolution were to succeed in India He says most probably instant justice dogmatic and Puritanical life Soviet style post revolutionary rot vast May Day paradesSection four has details of meetings with high profile officials super cops like KPS Gill and ex maharajas in Andhra Orissa Delhi etc The official view on combating Naxalism emerges as follows the Bodos came home when they were beaten down The ULFA will come home now because they are beaten down fully Everywhere in the world terrorists revolutionaries whatever only talk to you when they have been already beaten on the ground So it looks as though Maoism will be dealt with through a lot of violence and heavy handedness just as in the 1970s in West Bengal and just like what the US does in the war against al aeda and ISISThe final chapter finds the author leaving Chattisgarh for the forests of Jharkhand for investigationsThe book is a well balanced one It is neither pro administration nor pro Maoist but mainly pro India s poor It brings out graphically the callous attitude of govt officials the police and the politicians in appropriating the flow of funds into the tribal regions If all the funds spent on Bastar since 1947 were added up and totaled with interest it would come to ten million rupees for each family but there is no evidence of any development still says the author On the other hand history shows that every violent insurgent movement if they don t end up securing power eventually ends up as extortionist The Maoist movement also is extortionist after nearly fifty years of struggle I also have doubts about the Maoist threat being so massive yet Everyone says that there is a red corridor stretching from Andhra to Nepal and spread over fifteen of the 28 states in India But the numbers from even the most threatened State such as Chattisgarh shows that in 2013 about 130 people died in the insurgency including Maoists police and civilians This belies the image of a great internal security threat The book is mandatory reading particularly for those who are interested in this uestion and who also have some background on the history of the Maoist movement in India It is commendable that the author ventured into this investigation as an individual without the backing of any of the major media outlets He even spent his own personal money in traveling deep into Chattisgarh and Jharkhand as well as finding contacts so that he could meet some of the iconic figures on both sides of the divide Since the author has a deep understanding of the uestion and is also compassionate towards the tribal poor who are caught in the midst of this struggle he lets us make our own judgements without offering solutions In fact he must know that real solutions are perhaps not possible because the Maoists are not fighting only for Development for the poor Their campaign will end only when the present System is overthrown But then if the Govt manages to bring development good governance and justice to the marginalized and the poor in the Red Corridor it will take away the support of the masses to the Maoists and make it hard for them to push through with their agenda To that extent there is still a lot of truth in the maxim that Maoism in India can be countered only through Development

READ Red Sun By Sudeep Chakravarti

Red Sun By Sudeep Chakravarti

Serving chief minister was nearly killed in a landmine explosion triggered by the Naxalites He meets Maoist leaders and sympathizers policemen bureaucrats politicians security analysts development workers farmers and tribals people big and small who comprise the actors and the audience in this war being fought in jungles and impoverished villages across India What emerges is a sobering picture of a deeply divided society and the dangers that lie ahead for India. If you want to understand the history and practice of the Maoist revolution in India try Hello Bastar or Arundhati Roy s extraordinary Walking With the Comrades If you want to understand the particular and peculiar anxieties of Indian liberals read this

FREE READ Ì MZINES.CO.UK ´ Sudeep Chakravarti

In 1967 Naxalbari a village in West Bengal became the centre of a Mao inspired militant peasant uprising guided by firebrand intellectuals Today Naxalism is no longer the Che Guevara style revolution that it was Spread across 15 of India's 28 states it is one of the world's biggest most sophisticated extreme Left movements and feeds off the misery and anger of the dispossessed Since the late 1990s hardly a week has passed without people dying in strikes and cou. A surprisingly well written and well researched account on the subjectThe book starts with some detailed maps and statistics regarding the people s war movement in India and ends with the urban perspective plan 2004 of CPI Maoist attached as an appendix The amount of organisation and how widespread the movement is is both revealing and scaryA travelogue rather than a history as the author himself claims but still he manages to give us a brief historical and ideological perspective regarding the movement since the Naxalbari The author does a good job of exposing the amount of state exploitation poverty rampant corruption caste violence and little or no justice in rural India Something the ruling classes and the middle classes of urban India chose to ignoreThe interviews with Maoists Maoist sympathisers bureaucrats and security personnel provide a lot of insight into the current situationThe futurePeace seems unlikely as the Naxals are dedicated to the Maoist ideology and the path of protracted armed revolution while the state seems determined to ignore the reality and go ahead with their unregulated neoliberal policies leading to further alienation and destitution