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È un universo leggero e affollato fondato meno sul dramma che sull'ironia che ruota intorno a due straordinari personaggi da una parte Pedro Camacho prolifico autore di radiodrammi per Radio Central a Lima e dall'altra Mario giovane studente perdigiorno che coltiva una s. He was in the prime of his life his fifties and his distinguishing traits a broad forehead an auiline nose a penetrating gaze the very soul of rectitude and goodnessGenius and insanity may or may not have a close concordat but stories of this kind never fail to fascinate me and even when they are subjected to satire as Llosa does with great effect in this case Pedro Camacho the man behind the metrically balanced name is an unbalanced maverick of singular mind to whom the only thing that matters in life is his art Every week he churns out radio serials by the dozens casting a hypnotic spell on his vast audience It is not long before he cracks under the strain of extreme overwork he is wont to justify as total devotion to his art When his narrator friend asks him if he intends to start a family and settle down Camacho shakes his head at the stupid uestion and replies incredulously Do you think it s possible to produce offspring and stories at the same time That one can invent imagine if one lives under the threat of syphilis Women and art are mutually exclusive my friend In every vagina an artist is buried What pleasure is there in reproducing Isn t that what dogs spiders cats do We must be original my friend As I read I was perplexed by the two dimensional clich s perfectly embodied in their exaggerated and flawless character traits It was as though Jeffrey Archer s ghost had got into Llosa s bloodstream Is that the best you could do Mr Llosa Come on My hunch that I were missing something turned out to be right It was in the middle of the third story I realised what was happening Pedro Camacho hadn t made appearance by that time but his electrifying radio serials were reproduced verbatim with all their pulpy gloss alternated by the second narrative stream that concerns the narrator Marito s account of his love affair with Aunt Julia The novel came truly to life in the second half when Camacho s stories took on the comical effect The scriptwriter has signature devices set in motion to churn out his theories of fiction Heroes of radio serials reflect what I d call their creator s obsessive compulsive disorder Each of them is highly committed to their ideals to the detriment of their personal lives their relationships and to everything that does not concern their preoccupation It s as though Pedro Camacho reinvents himself in every play he writes Soon the reader discerns formulaic storylines incessant repetitions taboo subjects predilection to catastrophic coincidences to shock the listener like accidents drownings burnings but most importantly characters from one story start popping up into other serials and those that he d killed in one episode make reappearance in another mixing up settings and plots confusing up situations and endings There was nothing when his patterns of thought and habits of writing collapsed Everything was a mess by the end Pedro Camacho was going mad and funnyIt would not exaggerate to say that the novel is anchored in the character of Pedro Camacho round which Llosa weaves the semi autobiographical story through Marito s struggles as an aspiring writer who falls in love in an odd way with Julia who is his aunt by marriage and thirteen years his senior a divorcee Reminiscing on old days Marito relates his struggles to make sense of his life at the time when he and Aunt Julia had challenged a big social taboo with their romance Even at its most intense they both know that their amorous relationship is a passing fantasy which is fated ab initio even if they defy their families and get married Still the certainty of eventual failure does not diminish the thrill of the adventureI do not know if a conjunction had ever been inappropriately employed to strike out a novel s title as in this case When we hear Adam and Eve we think of some association between them even if we don t know anything about them Conjunctive titles indicate a connection between the two subjects There is no such association between Aunt Julia and the scriptwriter save their separate links with Marito Except for a small and inconseuential meeting between them the two main characters of the novel keep orbiting in their separate spheres which means the two narrative streams are held together tenuously Marito s love story with Julia is held out in dramatic tension in the larger narrative but unfortunately Llosa struggles to round it off The reader is made to care about their passionate romance till the final twist when the whole thing crumbles in a self imposed drop scene Or perhaps Llosa divests too much information for it to leave any lingering effect on the reader Leaving it uncertain would probably have worked out better But then I m not the author of this novel Mario Vargas Llosa is and he is elouent engaging endearing He writes beautiful sentences dripping with wit and humour or at least his translator Helen Lane does in this case great work HelenThe novel is best enjoyed for its dramatic episodic uality seen in whole from a critic s distance it might not stand up to the scrutiny of a sharper eye I want to rate it moderately good at three stars but the bemused reader in me wants to award four stars for the entertaining tragicomic vein Llosa has strung me on I am even prepared to say that in satirising pulp fiction Llosa has made it seem much intellectually pleasing than the real pulp fiction ever is Another angle to the satire is some writers self indulgence We understand that Llosa is partly involved in self mockery as he makes his character utilise the same self adulatory language some high writers bestow on each other and elevate their art to a sublime level as though fiction writing or for that matter poetry is an otherworldly pursuit that cannot be understood by the herd like masses Yet beneath high sounding verbal games their work turns out to be uite ordinary and banal How could he be at one and the same time a parody of the writer and the only person in Peru who by virtue of the time he devoted to his craft and the works he produced was worthy of that name October 15

Summary ë PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ´ Mario Vargas Llosa

La tía Julia y el escribidor

Dei suoi sceneggiati e condannandosi infine al silenzio Mario diventerà invece uno scrittore di successo che uando incontrerà di nuovo il suo antico modello potrà vedere nell'oblio di lui una sorta di prefigurazione del suo futuro o forse del destino di tutti gli uomi. The modern novel is a conglomeration of different literary techniues styles true But which ones to use must be The preliminary uestion of every writer before he begins his novel MVL has decided in this one to split himself in two the separate entities living inside the man are Marito Varguitas the ingenue romantic who experiences a rich life full of romance adventures comical characters and Pedro Camacho the ugly dwarf only producing and producing serial dramas with a soldier like discipline and a robotic capacity until turning completely mad The writer must have these two ualities robust living the intrepid experience of extremes loves etc discipline discipline discipline How else will the writer ever get his product finished

Mario Vargas Llosa ´ 6 Download

Ua ambizione letteraria e che si innamora della zia divorziata Julia appunto con la uale finirà per convolare a nozze con grande scandalo dei familiari E mentre Pedro scivolerà a poco a poco in una dolce e inconcludente follia confondendo sempre più gravemente le trame. If you should happen to read it just ignore me Ignore all I ve written about It s not a real review In fact this is not review at allIt s been some years I read Aunt Julia and the Scriptwriter for the first time It was at hospital after my surgery waiting for Oh I didn t know what I was waiting for Anyway I was lying in bed like some miserable Lazarius looking like shit and feeling the same in a strange city with no one to talk Ok it doesn t matter So I was lying and thinking and thinking Chemotherapy radiation therapy and whatever Dreadful thoughts were flashing through my mind Screw itLike Picasso who had blue and rose periods in his painting I had then Latin American period in my reading life Full of Macondos labyrinths imaginary beings I m sure you know what I mean No wonder that I took with me such book O dear me we ve got everything here romance of young boy with his sophisticated aunt Julia scandalized at this family oohs and aahs gosh how she could she s older she s divorced she s amoral poor Marito she s ruining his life Meanwhile Marito wants to be a writer and settle one day in Paris But now his studying law and working at the local radio station Panamerica There he meets Pedro Camacho from next door Radio Central Oh Pedro what the guy he was I m pretty sure that was him who invented all that idiotic and stupid soap operas in all televisions Yes Pedro scripts the most ridiculous radio soap operas full of degenerations fires murders incest Name it he can do it Protagonists from one story appear in another just in purpose to be killed by drowning No matter that in the first one our hero was killed in fire already Apparently he was no lucky poor thing All events are and bizarre and finally are looping itself like some M ebius stripBesides we have cramped caf s full of tobacco smoke crowded streets of Lima sultry nights Atmosphere of passion Oh there is a bourgeoisie here with all its hypocrisy and dullness Prose of Llosa is vivid full of South American temperament and appetite for lifeIt was January frosty night and with every page I was like that freaking Cheshire cat grinned from ear to ear Don t get me wrong I m not saying that this book saved my life this book is neither the wisest nor the funniest I ve ever read I m only saying it helped me to survive that night I couldn t wish for then I made it others weren t so lucky And this book will always be reminding me of it


10 thoughts on “La tía Julia y el escribidor

  1. says:

    My second novel in a row by this author This one was named one of the best books of the year 1982 by the New York Times Book Review There’s a lot going on in this “multilayered novel” so I’ll add my comments to the basic summary on GRThe story is set in the Lima of the author's youth where a young student named Marito is toiling away in the news department of a local radio station His young life is disr

  2. says:

    He was in the prime of his life his fifties and his distinguishing traits a broad forehead an auiline nose a penetrating gaze the very soul of rectitude and goodnessGenius and insanity may or may not have a close concordat but stories of this kind never fail to fascinate me; and even when they are subjected to satire as Llosa does with great effect in this case Pedro Camacho – the man behind the metrically b

  3. says:

    Mario Vargas Llosa is one of few Nobel winning writers I have wanted to read for ages but I have to admit he wasn't near t

  4. says:

    I consider my experience with this book a love affair gone horribly wrong Once again I'm harshly reminded of the

  5. says:

    910 In those long ago days I was very young and lived with my grandparents in a villa with white walls in the Ca

  6. says:

    If you should happen to read it just ignore me Ignore all I’ve written about It’s not a real review In fact this is not review at allIt’s been some years I read Aunt Julia and the Scriptwriter for the first time It was at hospital after my surgery waiting for Oh I didn’t know what I was waiting for Anywa

  7. says:

    The modern novel is a conglomeration of different literary techniues styles true But which ones to use? must be The preliminary uesti

  8. says:

    That is what Contrafactus is all about In everyday thought we are constantly manufacturing mental variants on situations we face ideas we have or events that happen and we let some features stay exactly the same while others slip What features do we let slip? What ones do we not even consider letting slip? What events are perceived on some deep intuitive level as being close relatives of ones which really happened? What

  9. says:

    This was my first work by the award winning Mario Vargas Llosa but I hope it won't be my last What a fantastic novel It re

  10. says:

    I read this after The Time Of The Hero and was relieved by the simpler narrative form with its clear alteration between the narrator presumably loosely based on the author who is pursuing a romantic relationship with his aunt view spoilerthe