[PDF] The Canal ☆ Lee Rourke – PDF, Kindle eBook & TXT


10 thoughts on “The Canal

  1. says:

    Lee Rourke's use of repetition here is truly remarkable and at times poetic the canal itself; the swans; the helicopters; the teenage gang; the office building—the way that he handles each of these images as t

  2. says:

    Raw and bleak but beautifully so Sad and uiet mixed with a jolt or two of random violence To me it sort of felt like a mix of The Stranger and Concrete Island or Crash but told from the uniue POV of a post 911 post London Bombings mal

  3. says:

    How are you going to write this review Brad?I dunno Brad This is going to be seriously toughYou liked it though You liked it a lot so just write what you feelI liked parts of it a lot loved parts of it but it is so fucking depressingDepressing is goodDepressing can be good but it isn't entertaining I can't see m

  4. says:

    Exploring the state of boredom in a very surreal way The Canal is a really eerie story full of creativity and originality

  5. says:

    Books and films about boredom tend to be boring but this bucks the trend A man bored of his job hands in his resignation to go sit on the same bench by the banks of a canal running through North London Contemplating the litter and graffiti the bird life the airplanes overhead and the windowed office block with all the wage slaves inside He credits that work and play are just time filling activities to persuade

  6. says:

    “I’m not asking you to understand I’m asking you to listen” – Thoughts on The Canal by Lee RourkeFirst off a story of sorts – here is how I ended up reading this book “Oh a book on boredom That’s a new concept Interesting Maybe I should read it I definitely should read it Or maybe the boredom thing’s just

  7. says:

    In this interview Lee Rourke says that The Canal is about boredom and the fetishisation of modern culture and violence espe

  8. says:

    Flat screen monitors an old park bench the Park Crew suicide bombers swans an Airbus A320 an Audi TT 225 an unknown woman at a funeral boredomAll of these things factor together to make The Canal by Lee Rourke a fascinating glimpse into boredom How can boredom be interesting? Don't we avoid it? The unnamed narrator has left his job spending his days ruminating on life on an old bench near a canal in downtown London It's not the mo

  9. says:

    I was really excited after the first few pages because I thought I was going to get a Nicholson Baker style story about a guy who is bored and has lovely thoughts about completely innocuous things that he randomly happens to look at Rourke certainly has the writing chops to pull something like that off And at times throughout this slim volume he'd go off into those types of tangents that I enjoy so much finding meaning and joy by

  10. says:

    “Because I don’t know youI find it easier to talk to strangers real strangers”Sinking into this one I felt

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read Ö eBook or Kindle ePUB ´ Lee Rourke

The Canal

An electrifying debut novel that becomes a shocking tale about boredomIn a deeply compelling debut novel Lee Rourke a British underground sensation for his story collection Everyday tells the tale of a man who finds his life so boring it frightens him So he uits his job to spend some time sitting on a bench beside a uiet canal in a pla. How are you going to write this review BradI dunno Brad This is going to be seriously toughYou liked it though You liked it a lot so just write what you feelI liked parts of it a lot loved parts of it but it is so fucking depressingDepressing is goodDepressing can be good but it isn t entertaining I can t see myself coming back to this book anytime soonStill you loved the characters Yeah The narrator was good but I really loved the woman and that whole bit about wanting the son of the man she killed to recognize her Amazing stuff view spoiler She says So he can see I m just like everyone else that I m not some monster So he could see that I was just like him before Before whatBefore the police eventually find me and I m not given the chance to make people realize that I m just like them hide spoiler

review The Canal

Cid London neighborhood watching the swans in the water and the people in the glass fronted offices across the way while he collects himselfHowever his solace is soon interupted when a jittery young woman begins to show up and sit beside him every day Although she won't even tell him her name she slowly begins to tell him a chilling st. I m not asking you to understand I m asking you to listen Thoughts on The Canal by Lee RourkeFirst off a story of sorts here is how I ended up reading this book Oh a book on boredom That s a new concept Interesting Maybe I should read it I definitely should read it Or maybe the boredom thing s just a ploy you know those kinds of books promising narration of an eually promising point of view until you actually read it and then find out it s a total waste of time and brain cells Then again I wouldn t know until I try Oh well no harm done in reading it And that was thatA person needs three things when reading Lee Rourke s The Canal patience patience and patience But don t get me wrong I didn t enumerate patience three times to emphasize a great deal needed for this book Rather different things call for different kinds of patience and so you need three versions of it for three things patience for the story patience for the unnamed narrator and patience for the shifting fascinations on things namely on ducks gravity and airplanesAm I making sense here Not really no Here let me try againI m the kind of person who stubbornly reads through a book no matter what Sometimes I put them down for a time a day or two a week a month until I run out of other books to read and I have no other choice but for as long as I ve started reading them I have a need to finish them Fortunately The Canal didn t need to be put down out of boredom on the contrary I had to stop reading to prolong the agony before the last chapter something I did not expect to be doing when I started reading Which is why dear readers it is a book that should not I repeat not be judged by its first 50 pagesThe narrator nameless faceless jobless even is probably the most bored person I ve read of He reminds me of that dude from Bret Easton Ellis s Less Than Zero except that this narrator isn t filthy rich nor young nor with an identity even Our narrator however has a lush vocabulary Some examples I d say it was almost crepuscular I hoped that my crumbling riposte the previous week hadn t alarmed her looking at the multitudinous rooftops of Hackney So to say that the narration is lifeless and boring is just plain wrong nobody uses miasma in everyday sentence let alone on everyday thought The upside to our male narrator is an eually nameless albeit mysterious female subject who is harboring a secret On page 51Told you not to judge by its first 50 pagesThis secret is the thing that bonds these two strangers she talks he listens Bored people will listen to just about anything she said and so he is consumed by her confidences to the point that he obsesses over her identity and her lessness made it all the terrifying and what had brought her to the canal where he spends his boring days What she shares would shock any of us in real life I m sure but then again isn t it easier opening up to strangers Unlike my friends the few I have I don t care what you think about me Rourke writes with subtle OCD his attention to detail covering ducks and canal dredgers and airplanes he can shift from the general picture to Boeing 747s and specific sub auatic birds The book s tone is set to somber yet I can t help but think of Rourke s writing as uirky uietly dizzying or whatever oxymoron fits the description I disagree with John Wray s blurb at the back of the book The Canal may look at first glance like a love story because it is a love story Only it s not about the love story but something elseOverall The Canal is one elaborately long suspenseful scene stretched so far for as long you can take it and then in one swift movement Rourke lets you go It starts with boredom yes but then again boredom leads to many thingsPS Rourke s description of rain a cacophony of mini auatic explosions just perfectOriginally posted here

read Ö eBook or Kindle ePUB ´ Lee Rourke

Ory about a terrible act she committed something for which she just can't forgive herself and which seems to have involved one of the men they can see working in the building across the canalTorn by fear and pity the man becomes immersed in her tale and finds that boredom has indeed brought him to the most terrifying place he's ever be. Flat screen monitors an old park bench the Park Crew suicide bombers swans an Airbus A320 an Audi TT 225 an unknown woman at a funeral boredomAll of these things factor together to make The Canal by Lee Rourke a fascinating glimpse into boredom How can boredom be interesting Don t we avoid it The unnamed narrator has left his job spending his days ruminating on life on an old bench near a canal in downtown London It s not the most scenic location dirty water a roving gang commuters and the occasional coot or swan may pass nearby but no one seems to sit Until himAs he sits he imagines the lives of the people who uite literally cross his path and he reflects on his own experiences Having the freedom to just sit is something he s not used to it s the power of everyday boredom that compels people to do things even if that something is nothing He notices that all the efforts to avoid boredom usually in order to be productive or to entertain never really accomplish anything It is found time an appreciation for not filling every moment that makes time meaningful for him And this he does spending and time at the canal It is only after the pace of his life has slowed that the really exciting and life changing events begin to happen But this is no new age inspirational story What he discovers are terrible crimes and intentional cruelties all tied together by acts done out of boredomI ve often thought that we seek reality in places and not in ourselvesWe need things extra things that help us to make sense of it all we need the space where things can happen where these spaces become a thing it is only at that point when space becomes a thing to us that we truly feel real The narrator considers the nature of time as an object one to be treasured The different characters he meets are similarly lost filling up time without understanding that their actions are actually just throwing it away It baffles me why people are so obsessed with trying to fill this time with holidays cars designer clothes technology energetic sports et cetera Why would they want time to pass by uicklyThose who bemoan the speedy passing of time at the end of their life are surely those same people who tried to fill it up with things to uicken its passing anyway aren t theyThe novel is brief we know little about the narrator s appearance home or prior job he doesn t even have a cell phone We know small details about his family but the impression is that he doesn t see them He s a complicated figure he is fascinated by flight admiring the planes descending into Heathrow and yet he s nearly motionless himself Throughout the remainder of the story the concepts of time and flight intersect and the denouement finds both fractured The effect is complex and mysterious and one of those rare books that may yield insight by being read again

  • Paperback
  • 199
  • The Canal
  • Lee Rourke
  • English
  • 05 September 2019
  • 9781935554011

About the Author: Lee Rourke

www3ammagazinecom He lives by the sea