[They Bled Blue [BOOK] Free read eBook by Jason Turbow – TXT or Kindle

Jason Turbow Ò 4 Free download

They Bled Blue

The season’s real story however was one that nobody expected at the outset a chubby lefthander nearly straight out of Mexico twenty years old with a wild delivery and a screwball as his flippin’ out pitch The Dodgers had been trying for decades to find a Hispanic star to activate the local Mexican population; Fernando Valenzuela was the first to succeed and it didn’t take long for Fernandomania to sweep far beyond the boundaries of Chavez Ravine They Bled Blue is the rollicking yarn of the Los Angeles Dodgers’ crazy 1981 season . than any other sport baseball is entangled with its history Even as we witness magnificent feats in the present our eyes turn ever toward the past Whether it is through statistics or stories baseball fans love to look backAuthor Jason Turbow has a knack for transporting us to times gone by and thoroughly revisiting players and teams from the game s history We re not talking about grainy black and white history however these are teams whose memories are still vivid in the minds of fans of a certain ageHis latest is They Bled Blue Fernandomania Strike Season Mayhem and the Weirdest Championship Baseball Had Ever Seen The 1981 Los Angeles Dodgers That mouthful of a title looks back nearly 40 years digging into the particulars of an iconic franchise during one of the strangest seasons baseball had ever seenSeriously the sport had never seen anything uite like the 1981 Dodgers From the full on phenomenon that was Fernando Valenzuela to the era ending turn from one of the game s longest serving infields from a season split in two by labor strife to the strangest postseason set up ever it was a time of turmoil and triumphTommy Lasorda was at the helm of that team still in the early stages of a managerial career that would land him in the Hall of Fame He was the most ebullient effusive skipper in the history of the Dodgers franchise heck probably in the history of professional baseball His seemingly boundless devotion to the Dodgers served as the inspiration for this book s title Lasorda would tell anyone who would listen and plenty who wouldn t that he bled Dodger blueThis was the man in charge going into the 1981 season The Dodgers were in the midst of a run of almost greatness having won the NL pennant a couple of times in the late 1970s only to lose both times to the hated Yankees After a couple of down years it was starting to look as though the championship window might be closingThat s because the iconic Dodgers infield of first baseman Steve Garvey second baseman Davey Lopes shortstop Bill Russell and third baseman Ron Cey a group that had been together and producing at a high level for nearly a decade was beginning to show signs of age Guys like Dusty Baker and Reggie Smith were starting to get a little grayer as well These men who had given their all were getting a little long in the tooth If they were going to get that elusive title the clock was tickingOn the other side of the aging curve was a young pitcher not even old enough to drink whose emergence onto the scene would become one of the biggest stories of the season Sports have always featured their phenoms young players who appear and take the field or court or ice by storm Every sport at every level has youngsters who turn up and set the imaginations of fans ablazeBut we had never seen anything uite like Fernando ValenzuelaThe young pitcher with just a handful of big league innings under his belt began 1981 with an historic run of dominance He started 8 0 hurling five shutouts and putting up a miniscule 050 ERA The left hander threw a screwball that proved nigh impossible for even major league hitters to handle And while the dominance itself was story enough the fact that he was Mexican helped the Dodgers fully tap in to the sizeable Hispanic population that had yet to truly adopt the team as their ownAnd of course in the middle of it all the strike the first work stoppage since 1972 and the longest the game would see until 1994 Over a third of the season was lost with the players striking on June 12 and not returning until a delayed All Star Game on August 9 This led to an odd split season playoff situation with MLB crowning first half and second half winners that would then face off to determine division crowns before moving on to the Championship SeriesIt was a season for the ages one that helped the Dodgers reestablish themselves as one of the top tier organizations in baseball And hey weird season or not flags fly foreverWhat Turbow does so well with They Bled Blue is capture the spirit of the moment The game wasn t yet the multi billion dollar industry it is today though it was on its way Free agency was still in its infancy with the truly massive paydays still a decade or in the future Still the game was in flux as demonstrated by the willingness of the players to walk away in an effort to get what they felt was fair treatmentThe Dodgers roster was populated by characters Yes there was Fernando though he was exciting on the field than off Guys like the sueaky clean Garvey who wasn t as pure as fans might have believed Speedster Lopes was fighting off the up and coming star Steve Sax Ditto catcher Steve Yeager who had Mike Scioscia in his rearview Russell and Smith struggled with injuries while the talented Pedro Guerrero was on the upswingAnd in the middle of it all a perpetual motion machine powered by passion and profanity was Tommy Lasorda saying and doing whatever it took to keep the eyes of his suad on the prize a World Series title They Bled Blue encapsulates the uniue time and place in which this team existed There was never a season uite like 1981 and there was never a team uite like the Dodgers Lucky for us we have someone like Jason Turbow ready to lay it all out for us It is a delightful and detailed exploration of the game as it once was an ideal summer read for any baseball fan interested in the stories of the sport

review They Bled Blue

Team The Dodgers were led by the garrulous Tommy Lasorda part manager part cheerleader who unyieldingly proclaimed devotion to the franchise through monologues about bleeding Dodger blue and worshiping the “Big Dodger in the Sky” and whose office hosted a regular stream of Hollywood celebrities Steve Garvey the All American All Star first baseman had anchored the most durable infield in major league history and along with Davey Lopes Bill Russell and Ron Cey was glaringly aware that 1981 would represent the end of their run together. 1981 has been remembered as one of the strangest baseball seasons in the history of the game The season was split in two due to a player s strike and the division winners in each half made the postseason even though that meant the two best overall teams in the National League missed the playoffs A rookie pitcher who had a body that was closer to resembling a keg than a six pack took baseball by storm Four infielders who had played together for nearly eight years were on their last uest together The link for the last two points was the Los Angeles Dodgers who ended up as the champions in three exciting postseason series Their uest to the championship is documented in this breezy fun to read book by Jason Turbow While the book reports on the 1981 Dodgers season in chronological order it is not the typical this happened then that happened type of season recap It actually starts in 1978 when the New York Yankees defeated the Dodgers in that year s World Series winning the last four games after Los Angeles won the first two That plays as motivation for many of the players who were on that team including the four infielders who had been on the team and playing nearly every game since 1973 Along the way the reader will learn a lot about all four of them first baseman Steve Garvey second baseman Davey Lopes shortstop Bill Russell and third baseman Ron Cey However the best personal story in the book was also the best baseball story of that year Turbow does an excellent job of bringing the reader into the world of Fernando Valenzuela a 20 year old rookie pitcher with a portly body a lack of ability to speak English and a devastating screwball He won his first eight decisions with an ERA under one and took the baseball world by storm Being of Mexican heritage he became a hero to the Mexican population in Los Angeles which makes up a significant portion of the city s residents How he handled this fame especially when he was a guest of President Ronald Reagan at the White House was the best reading in the book along with stories about manager Tommy Lasorda The book was capped off by providing an excellent account of the Dodgers postseason run In the Division Series only made possible by the split season they fell behind the Houston Astros two games to none in the best of five series only to win three straight to capture the series Then in another best of five series they defeated the Montreal Expos in thrilling fashion with Rick Monday hitting a homer to win the game for Los Angeles in the ninth inning of game five Then the Dodgers made the three year wait to face the Yankees again worth it defeating them in six games in the same manner as New York won in 1978 lost the first two games won the next four The description of the games the players emotions and the joy of the entire city was well written Dodger fans will want to add this book to their collection as it is very likely the best source of information on that crazy championship season for them Baseball fans and historians who are interested in that team should pick it up as well I wish to thank Houghton Mifflin Harcourt for providing a copy of the book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest reviewhttpssportsbookguyblogspotcom20

review Ô PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook Ò Jason Turbow

The wildly entertaining narrative of the outrageous 1981 Dodgers from the award winning author of Dynastic Fantastic Bombastic and The Baseball Codes In the Halberstam tradition of capturing a season through its unforgettable figures They Bled Blue is a sprawling mad tale of excess and exuberance the likes of which could only have occurred in that place at that time That it culminated in an unlikely World Series win during a campaign split by the longest player strike in baseball history is not even the most interesting thing about this. The Dodgers I have issues with the current version of the team because they have been a rival to my team the Cubs in recent years The west coast s swagger vs the Midwest s grittiness California s star power and late arriving crowd pitted against the multi generation fans of Chicago Ok so I really don t like the Dodgers of today although I do enjoy stories of the old time Brooklyn Dodgers This book however is about neither and its author Jason Turbow dislikes the Dodgers even than I do because he is a Giants fan I have in the past read Turbow s book on the 1970s Oakland A s teams and found it entertaining so I decided to get past my dislike for the current Dodgers and give They Bled Blue a try If anything the author and I could commiserate in our detesting the Los Angeles version of the Dodgers During the 1970s one could almost feel sorry for the Dodgers because they were perennial bridesmaids coming up short against the Reds Big Red Machine teams and then getting past the Reds losing to the Yankees in two consecutive World Series It is not as though the Dodgers lacked for uality players fielding an infield that played together for nine straight seasons Put together by general manager Al Campanis comprised of a mix of home grown veterans key acuisitions and rookie stars the 1981 Dodgers looked primed to finally get over the hump Led by the man who embodied the Dodgers culture than anyone Tommy Lasorda the players who had been on the team the longest realized that their window to win would be ending soon and they had the need to win now mentality With Lasorda s who had been with the team in some capacity since the 1950s word as final the 1981 Dodgers appeared determined to win one for their skipper and for themselves The 1981 season as Turbow points out was notable for two key things The first is that the Dodgers called up a rookie from Mexico named Fernando Valenzuela to become the ace of their staff Although shy and having a language barrier Valenzuela brought a poise beyond his years to the mound and started the year 8 0 Immediately the Mexican American community near Los Angeles rallied around their new star and became Dodger fans overnight The second event that the 1981 is known for is a mid season player strike With free agency only five years old players and owners were stilling ironing out details of contracts and compensation Things came to a head in the middle of June and the players went on strike for over a month The two sides agreed to divide the season into two halves with the division champions of each half meeting in an abbreviated playoff series following the season Fernando would not be able to save the Dodgers if the team lost in a playoff series that in normal years was not part of baseball s post season Because I was only a year and half during the 1981 season the strike was lost on me Although I watched games with my dad already by then I did not become knowledgeable of games until three years later when the Cubs had a winning season By 1984 free agency was an accepted part of the game In 1981 owners still demanded compensation if one of their star players bolted for a longer higher contract elsewhere Although a noble idea compensation did not last and teams losing free agents are given extra draft picks in the name of competitive balance How baseball continues to keep an even playing field continues to evolve Turbow focuses on the business of baseball as he did when describing the Oakland A s as well As one has aspired to be a general manager for her entire life I appreciate Turbow devoting chunks of his books to the business side of baseball The Dodgers are a class organization and run operations better than most so it was intriguing to see how management decided which players to keep and jettison In the end they kept the right mix of veterans and young stars to field a championship team Turbow points out that the team came down to its manager and the key decisions he made in spite of the players strong personalities A testament to his legacy is that four players on the team became managers including Dusty Baker and Mike Soiscia who led the crosstown Angels for nearly twenty years Somehow the Dodgers motley cast of characters prevailed in 1981 They beat an Astros team led by Nolan Ryan an Expos team featuring three future Hall of famers and their rival Yankees to capture their elusive championship Within the next two years their iconic team was jettisoned for younger flashier players Turbow made the World Series seem exciting even though I already knew the outcome as I am reminded by my husband the Yankees fan who detests the Dodgers I can relate Like Jason Turbow I really don t like the Dodgers other than Sandy Koufax or Jackie Robinson In writing a book about a team he grew up detesting Jason Turbow gave baseball fans insight into the Dodger organization and gave us a glimpse of how their uality management team works 4 stars


10 thoughts on “They Bled Blue

  1. says:

    The Dodgers I have issues with the current version of the team because they have been a rival to my team the Cubs in recent years The west coast’s swagger vs the Midwest’s grittiness California’s star power and late arriving crowd pitted against the multi generation fans of Chicago Ok so I really don’t like the Dodgers of today although I do enjoy stories of the old time Brooklyn Dodgers This book however is a

  2. says:

    The Dodgers were nearing the end of their time together The heralded infield had been together for 9 years losing the Worl

  3. says:

    First it would be unfair not to admit growing up this reader was a huge LA Dodger fan during the era written about in this bookReading They Bled Blue by Jason Turbow that primarily deals with the 1981 baseball season of the LA Dodgers of the strike shortened season was like taking a pleasurable trip down nostalgia lane The book describes the 1981 season how the Dodgers arrived at where they found their team and culminates in the W

  4. says:

    1981 has been remembered as one of the strangest baseball seasons in the history of the game The season was split in two due to a player’s strike and the division winners in each half made the postseason even though that meant the two best overall teams in the National League missed the playoffs A rookie pitcher who had a body that was closer to resembling a keg than a six pack took baseball by storm Four i

  5. says:

    I received a free copy of this book from Net Galley in exchange for an honest review They Bled Blue is the rollicking yarn of the Los Angeles Dodgers’ crazy 1981 season a watershed campaign that cemented the team’s place and reputation as fitting thoroughly within the surrounding LA culture That it culminated in an unlikely World Series

  6. says:

    To the puzzlement of my family my Dh and my in laws I have been a long time Dodgers fan who grew up in Giants' country Dh and I compro

  7. says:

    than any other sport baseball is entangled with its history Even as we witness magnificent feats in the present our eyes turn ever toward the past Whether it is through statistics or stories baseball fans love to look backAuthor Jason Turbow has a knack for transporting us to times gone by and thoroughly revisiting players and tea

  8. says:

    I clearly remember the time I went to my first Major League Baseball game It was 1981 and a school field trip to Wrigley Field The Cubs only played day games back then and it wasn’t unusual or difficult for scho

  9. says:

    45 stars This is a very good book on the history of the Dodgers first championship season under Lasorda Turbow avoids the main pitfall of a book like this the then this happened then this happened type of book that's little than a series of game recaps He focuses less on the games than on the people He interviewed every

  10. says:

    So this is the second Jason Turnbow book I have read The other about the bombastic A's was a five star book to me This book is still very enjoyable and easy to read Turnbow covers the personalities of the 81 club in suffici

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *