David Hepworth ( epub ) A Fabulous Creation – Book, Kindle ePUB or eBook Online

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Rself a means of attracting the opposite sex and for many the single most desirable object in their livesThis is the story of that time; it takes us from recording studios where musicians were doing things that had never been done before to the sparsely furnished apartments where their efforts would be received like visitations from a higher power This is the story of how LPs saved our live. And now for something completely differentThe LP The album as It was hipper to call them The golden age when you walked around with one under your arm because th e cover would be instantly recognisable to those who mattered and would mark you out as who you were In the smallish town I spent my formative years in I walked around for days with Family s Music from a Dolls House under my arm I got a boyfriend because of it I ve still got that album Albums were precious and the experience of listening was a communal one We shared music in those days This is about the albums and the bands who made them and the people who made the bands who made themsound OK enough mostly so you could listen and enjoy without being on the same drugs the band were on This is a cultural history of rather a long moment It is very good Read it Like we did the lyrics in the back of the album cover The title as any fule kno is from Roxy Music s Do The Strand a fabulous creation indeed which also boasts the line Rhododendron it s a nice flower

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A Fabulous Creation

The era of the LP began in 1967 with ‘Sgt Pepper’; The Beatles didn’t just collect together a bunch of songs they Made An Album Henceforth everybody else wanted to Make An AlbumThe end came only fifteen years later coinciding with the release of Michael Jackson’s ‘Thriller’ By then the Walkman had taken music out of the home and into the streets and the record business had begun. Over the past couple of years David Hepworth has been cementing his already considerable reputation as a pop music writer and commentator with books that leave you feeling simultaneously inadeuate yet brilliantly cleverer for having been in the close proximity of his world This latest book is as much a social history of how our consumption of music has changed thanks to technology and innovation sometimes outside the music business as it is about the glory of the 12 LPHepworth is a superb and genial narrator This book is packed with anecdotes that you can use down the pub to look awfully clever rammed to the rafters with facts than you could shake a shaky tone arm at and curated by someone who you know is approaching their subject with as much love as scholarly application Hepworth is unapologetic in what he regards as good and bad and for the most part you find yourself agreeing with his choices Part of the reason for this is unlike many music critics he is neither cruel nor petty and recognises the unalloyed joy that music brings At the end of the day he is a fan The book covers the glory years of the LP from 1967 and The Beatles Sgt Pepper through to Michael Jackson s Thriller in 1982 Hepworth is especially strong on the 1970s as you might expect from someone living through that decade as a maturing adult and his discerning observations of what was happening around this amazing surfeit of music is wittily and pithily observed One can have arguments with the albums contained here and one suspects the author would only be too pleased to know such arguments are taking place and he s also short on recognising that post 1982 there have continued to be some wonderful examples of LP genius but this is the whole point of this book It s a point of view an argument and for this reader I was only disappointed when the book finished Joyous

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Trying to reverse engineer the creative process in order to make big money Nobody would play music or listen to it in uite the same way ever againIt was a short but transformative time Musicians became ‘artists’ and we the people patrons of the arts The LP itself had been a mark of sophistication a measure of wealth an instrument of education a poster saying things you dare not say you. I have always enjoyed David Hepworth s writing whether it be his music journalism for various publications or recently the music based books that he has written and this one s no exception Hepworth serves up a history of the rockpop long playing record from the Beatles 1967 release Sgt Pepper s Lonely Hearts Club Band through to Micheal Jackson s Thriller in 1982 He picks Sgt Pepper as his starting point as basically this was in his opinion the first proper album which didn t just contain 2 hit singles and a load of filler and ends with Thriller as from then on record companies were interested in making money than the music The chapters are written for each specific year and he describes the significant albums from those years and also the innovations in the recording of the music and in the music industry that came about during those years How music went from a communal pursuit where friends would gather round the stereo system listening to the latest albums to it becoming a singular activity where people listened on headphones to their Walkman or to present day where we now listen to downloads on our phones I thoroughly enjoyed this book but like most music books I don t always agree with the author s view but that s music for you I am slightly younger than Mr Hepworth and my serious music buying didn t start until the early 70 s and therefore my taste is slightly different and my view of some records vary from his but that s probably because a lot of the earlier stuff I only discovered later in life However a lot of the things he describes rang a lot of bells with me especially how we had to hunt down particular records and also the pride one felt carrying a specific album about under ones arm as we walked about town I always enjoy the tone of Mr Hepworth writing which I have difficulty explaining but he is very god at writing peoplethings down but in a humorous way and with some very witty rejoinders I also enjoyed the appendix at the end of the book where he gives a brief review of the significant albums of each year that the book covers and it also gave me a few ideas of bands that need further exploration on my partI look forward to his next publication which is Rock n Roll A Level which I assume will be a a challenging uiz book by the sound of it


10 thoughts on “A Fabulous Creation

  1. says:

    Over the past couple of years David Hepworth has been cementing his already considerable reputation as a pop music writer and commentator with books that leave you feeling simultaneously inadeuate yet brilliantly cleverer for having been in the close proximity of his world This latest book is as much a social history of how our consumption of music has changed thanks to technology and innovation sometimes outside the music business as it

  2. says:

    Oh No I may be growing tired of David HepworthI usually really enjoy his writing I uite often don't agree with him but that leads to a rather pleasant argument with him in my own head where he can't talk backBut this one disappointed me somewhat He does talk a lot of bollocks of course and is over fond of a sw

  3. says:

    In recent years David Hepworth has been pumping out excellent books on classic rock pop in short order this his fourth ma

  4. says:

    Breezy tour of the long playing record written as both memoir and cultural history Some acts may not ring a bell to American audiences especially those of us who embraced pop over artists who labored over their art I don’t recall Television at all nor Joy Division so that’s maybe a true test of the power of Top 40 radio You had to hunt some of this music down in record bins because the drive time DJs sure didn’t play it The

  5. says:

    I have always enjoyed David Hepworth's writing whether it be his music journalism for various publications or recently the music based books that he has written and this one's no exception Hepworth serves up a history of the rockpop long playing record from the Beatles 1967 release Sgt Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band through to Micheal Jackson's Thriller in 1982 He picks Sgt Pepper as his starting point as ba

  6. says:

    Even though I'm a Gen Xer and LPs were already in their dying years when I was a teen I still get the melancholy feel of this book but it's a pleasant nostalgia not a whinge

  7. says:

    And now for something completely differentThe LP The album as It was hipper to call them The golden age when you walked around with one under your arm because th e cover would be instantly recognisable to those who mattered and would mark you out as who you were In the smallish town I spent my formative years in I walked

  8. says:

    I’ve been a fan of David Hepworth’s writing for many years and his Schrodinger like approach to music holding both the option t

  9. says:

    One of the few high points of 2020’s coronavirus lockdown has been the ‘Word in Your Attic’ videos on You Tune between David Hepworth his longtime friend collaborator Mark Ellen and a guest just shooting the breeze or in their vernacular ‘taking a trip to bllcks island’ Hepworth is a laconic northern Eeyore balancing out the Tigger

  10. says:

    This is the third book of Hepworth’s I’ve read Each draws on his long career as a music writer and each serves as an affectionate elegy for the rock’n’roll era and with it the twilight of the baby boom of which I am a late entry Like