Colum McCann [Ebook epub] TransAtlantic

Colum McCann ô 6 READ & DOWNLOAD

No history is mute No matter how much they own it break it and lie about it human history refuses to shut its mouth Despite deafness and ignorance the time that was continues to tick inside the time that is Colum McCann demonstrates once again why he is one of the most acclaimed and essential authors of his generation with a soaring novel that spans continents leaps centuries and unites a cast of deftly rendered characters both real and imaginedNewfoundland 1919 Two aviators Jack Alcock and Arthur Brown set course for Ireland as they attempt the first nonstop flight across the Atlantic Ocean placing their trust in a modified bomber to heal the wounds of the Great WarDublin 1845 and ’46 On an international I was very happy to win a copy of TransAtlantic from Goodreads in return for an honest review I had been looking forward to this novel for some time As I have mentioned before I tend to be very picky about historical fiction an occupational hazard for some historians I want engaging style as well as good research and I sometimes have difficulty focusing on the characters and the plot instead of historical details I also tend to shudder at some writers tendency to name drop as many famous historical figures as they can In TransAtlantic McCann does not disappoint As he moves back and forth over time and across space he does include famous historical figures in the first half of the novel Frederick Douglass George Mitchell and in the beautifully crafted opening chapters Jack Alcock and Teddy Brown All are men all move back and forth across the Atlantic from England to Ireland or from the United States to Ireland McCan explores different understandings of freedom and constraint as he moves his readers from setting to setting as we sit in a fragile airplane with Alcock and Brown looking for the Irish coast to appear through the mist as we watch with Frederick Douglass as he witnesses the struggles of the Irish during the Great Famine as we walk the halls of Stormont with George Mitchell striving for peace in Northern Ireland I easily could populate this review with photographs of these historical figures They are all inspiring men and McCann writes about them with a reserved awe all the so because he depicts them with their humanity intact perhaps with the exception of George Mitchell who comes across as dignified and contained definitely admirable but not always 100% human But the heart and soul of TransAtlantic is not so much in these historical figures as in the women that McCann creates related by blood circling these famous men like satellites while they engage in their own battles for freedom and family Lily Bridie Fitzpatrick n e Lily Duggan who meets Frederick Douglass while she was working as a maid in Dublin and who travels across the Atlantic in search of the freedom that he represents to her Her daughter Emily and he granddaughter Lottie who cover the flight of Alcock and Brown as journalist and photographer breaking barriers of gender Lottie s later life in Northern Ireland with her family her husband Ambrose her daughter Hannah and her grandson Tomas all seeking peace in the family lough in the shadow of The Troubles And finally Hannah s struggles with memory loss and a history that remains raw and personal McCann s structure for this novel works beautifully I ve read comparisons with David Mitchell s structure for Cloud Atlas but TransAtlantic remains much contained and personal because of family ties and McCann s interweaving of characters from section to section He reminds us that history is not only made by famous people who have pages in history textbooks and shelves of libraries devoted to them There are also people living their lives sustaining hopes and coping with heartache spiraling around them These individuals are not simply touched by history they create history they curate it and own it and try desperately to find ways to connect themselves to their pasts to their loved ones and memories while looking ahead into an uncertain future McCann brings these people all of us alive through the experiences of the women in his novel

READ TransAtlantic

TransAtlantic

H housemaid Lily Duggan who crosses paths with Frederick Douglass the novel follows her daughter and granddaughter Emily and Lottie and culminates in the present day story of Hannah Carson in whom all the hopes and failures of previous generations live on From the loughs of Ireland to the flatlands of Missouri and the windswept coast of Newfoundland their journeys mirror the progress and shape of history They each learn that even the most unassuming moments of grace have a way of rippling through time space and memoryThe most mature work yet from an incomparable storyteller TransAtlantic is a profound meditation on identity and history in a wide world that grows somehow smaller and wondrous with each passing ye Trite but true all good things must come to an end I so wanted to keep reading the wonderful prose the settings that let one think they are part of the story and the wonderful characters that this novel contains McCann has the knack of illuminating the everyday things of a person s life hidden pride glowing praise love for country family and children Everyday items inconseuential things assume a meaning that often in apparent only in hindsight Taking real historical characters and mixing them with characters of his own invention and making the story realistic takes a very great talent Covering the pure amount of history in a little than 250 pgs fills one with wonder It is very important to pay attention to the prologue also the small events that keep reappearing in different places The first part of the book is not linear the second part covers some wonderfully strong woman characters and like a master weaver he threads them throughout history and combines them to make a cohesive and finished piece It is also a homage to Ireland their fight and uest for freedom intermingled with America and slavery This is a book that contain so many wonderful uotes one could uote indefinitely but this is one of my favorites and a good way to end this review There isn t a story in the world that isn t in part at least addressed to the past And so it goesARC from publisher

FREE READ Í PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ô Colum McCann

Lecture tour in support of his subversive autobiography Frederick Douglass finds the Irish people sympathetic to the abolitionist cause despite the fact that as famine ravages the countryside the poor suffer from hardships that are astonishing even to an American slaveNew York 1998 Leaving behind a young wife and newborn child Senator George Mitchell departs for Belfast where it has fallen to him the son of an Irish American father and a Lebanese mother to shepherd Northern Ireland’s notoriously bitter and volatile peace talks to an uncertain conclusionThese three iconic crossings are connected by a series of remarkable women whose personal stories are caught up in the swells of history Beginning with Iris This was enchanting to me Three immersions in historical events and people that involve a crossing of the Atlantic between Ireland and North America They happen to be male two British airmen making the first crossing after World War 1 Frederick Douglass on a speaking tour of Ireland in 1845 and the former Maine Senator George Mitchell helping negotiate the Northern Ireland peace accord between 1995 and 1998 These disparate events have links though time by three generations of fictional women bound up in human eddies in the wake of the passage of historical figures The narrative weaves all this into a wonderful braid that bridges continents A young girl in Irish immigrant family in Newfoundland gets to meet the British flyers and photographs them for her father s newspaper story There is a family connection between her backward to a woman who Douglass has significant interactions with in Ireland and a forward connection to people in Mitchell s experience during his time in Ireland This kind of construction is fun to experience and not too far from the pleasures of David Mitchell s creations The inscription from Galeano that starts the book tells us that Despite deafness and ignorance the time that was continues to tick inside the time that is The independent stories are fascinating to get embedded in while we wait to find any connection with each other Our time machine starts with the flyers Alcott and Brown being motivated to do something positive with their bomber plane and experiences of the war Part two goes back in time with Douglass for whom time s arrow points forward toward the Civil War in America and for his hosts the incipient famine and violent strife over Irish independence With the Mitchell section we spin far forward but the burden of his task is to somehow put closure on the smoldering conflict over the fate of Northern Ireland with a history extending far back in time The mutual fascination between the Irish and Douglass was great to see come to life with McCann s mastery of perception speech and personalities The Irish saw him as a hero to aspire to a freed slave who pulled himself up by his bootstraps and garnered respect from peoples high and low by the power of his words In turn Douglass identified with their struggles for rights as an underclass virtually enslaved by the wealthy You can t help but wonder how his arguments for a pathway to a just society took roots there or how his seeing the struggles of the Irish energized his fight against slaveryI loved the section on Mitchell whom I admire as a former Senate Majority Leader from my state of Maine It was pretty audacious for McCann to make a living figure a fictional character Being the son of an ethnic Irish father who was a janitor and a Lebanese immigrant mother who was a textile worker he makes for an appropriate figure to recognize the power of people to change and bridge differences I was moved over coverage in this story of his trepidation over taking up the task given him by Clinton as a Special Envoy and of his personal sacrifice in leaving his new young wife and infant son for so long Accepting Sinn F in at the table was critical to the three year process leading to the Belfast Peace Accord of 1998 and really only achieving fruition with the relinuishment of arms by the IRA in 2005A lot of friends who are fans of history books get affronted by fictional versions of significant historical figures I think a lot of truth can be revealed in a particular version of a figure a theory if you will is given life in fictional narrative replete with dialog and access to their internal emotions On this topic I like what McCann said in an interview in the back of the book I suppose one of the reasons for writing TransAtlantic is that I wanted to uestion the gulf between what is real and what is imagined Is there any difference at all Can the imagined be considered real And vice versa Is Tom Joad not real because he was imagined by SteinbeckA story is a story whether it is based on real life characters or not A real person should be as fully fleshed as an invented I have a duty to all my characters And I want to braid the tapestry together so that fiction and nonfiction get confusedI loved this tapestry and look forward to reading from McCann having only read his Zoli


10 thoughts on “TransAtlantic

  1. says:

    I was very happy to win a copy of TransAtlantic from Goodreads in return for an honest review I had been looking forward to this novel for some time As I have mentioned before I tend to be very picky about histor

  2. says:

    UPDATE 7232013 TransAtlantic on the Long List for the MAN Booker PrizeRating 485 of fiveThe Book Description National Book Award winning novelist Colum McCann delivers his most ambitious and beautiful novel yet t

  3. says:

    The weight of words and the appreciation of the meaning they bear  The ironies of life and the small comforts

  4. says:

    As in LET THE GREAT WORLD SPIN McCann's new novel begins with a real event in the air and uses the opening narr

  5. says:

    The world that we inhabit is a small place and that has been as evident as ever in 2020 The ability to travel large distances in a short amount of time can be both a blessing and a curse With the click of a button aided by technological applications a person can talk to those on the other side of the world not having to l

  6. says:

    This was enchanting to me Three immersions in historical events and people that involve a crossing of the Atlantic between Ireland and North America They happen to be male two British airmen making the first crossing after World War 1; Frederi

  7. says:

    Trite but true all good things must come to an end I so wanted to keep reading the wonderful prose the settings that let one think they are part of the story and the wonderful characters that this novel contains McCann has the knack of illuminating the everyday things of a person's life hidden pride glowing praise love for country

  8. says:

    Colum McCann is a talented writer He can say in six words what most people can't say in 60 I really enjoyed this his latest novelFirst of all he has a way of making me interested in topics in which I had little or no interest prior The first transatlantic flight for instance Sure it's useful to know when it happened and who accomplished it but did I really care Nah Enter Colum McCann In a few paragraphs you'll feel as though you understand

  9. says:

    This review is going to be mostly about meSurpriseColum McCann is an Irish writer who in 2009 wrote that book about Philippe Petit w

  10. says:

    I delved right into this one without going back and reading the summary description on GR I stopped halfway through because I was confused Three narratives regarding three different men that didn't seem to connect Once I we

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *