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  • .com: 1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed Audible Audio Edition: Eric H. Cline, Andy Caploe, Audible Studios: Books
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  • 05 September 2018
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7 thoughts on “.com: 1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed Audible Audio Edition: Eric H. Cline, Andy Caploe, Audible Studios: Books

  1. says:

    It's a good book, one that fills in a significant gap that can often be seen in other books on the ancient Bronze Age societies. Cline is very, very careful to qualify findings, which makes a lot of sense but also gives the book a va

  2. says:

    [ I have edited this review to correct some flaws pointed out in comments. ]

    The other reviewers have already pointed out the book's many fine points; I agree with them that this is a book well worth reading. I had long thought that the Late Bronze Age Collapse was primarily due to the depredations of the Sea Peoples, and th

  3. says:

    Cline builds up a picture of an interconnected Bronze Age world in the Mediterranean, but in the end he effectively dismisses the collapse as somewhat inevitable due to it being a "complex system". In short, Bronze Age Med

  4. says:

    The book is titled "1177 BC The Year Civilization Collapsed", and yet less than half of it deals with the Bronze Age Collapse itself. The author ploughs on for over one hundred pages about how globalized civilization was in 1200 BCE, how rulers addressed each other in official correspondence, or which Pharaoh's cartouche was found under which pile of rubble, and when he finally gets to the point, we are presented with a list of theories for

  5. says:

    This is an excellent book I bought the book after seeing Professor Cline give a lecture on this topic he was so k

  6. says:

    I read and enjoyed this book. Its description of interacting (co dependent?) Bronze Age polities is valuable.
    However, amid discussions of everything from natural disaster to endemic warfare as an explanation for widespread late BA 'collap

  7. says:

    I love good ancient history books but most is written about classical Rome or Greece. 1177 is different. Very different and therefore refresh

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mzines.co.uk Ò 8 READ

.com: 1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed Audible Audio Edition: Eric H. Cline, Andy Caploe, Audible Studios: Books

Ulticultural world of these great civilizations he draws a sweeping panorama of the empires and globalized peoples of the Late Bronze Age and shows that it was their very interdependence that hastened their dramatic collapse and ushered in a dark age that lasted centuries A compelling combination of narrative and the latest scholarship 1177 BC sheds new light on the complex ties that gave rise to and ultimately destroyed the flourishing civilizations of the Late Bronze Age and that set the stage for the emergence of classical Greec. I read and enjoyed this book Its description of interacting co dependent Bronze Age polities is valuableHowever amid discussions of everything from natural disaster to endemic warfare as an explanation for widespread late BA collapse beyond elite gift exchange there is little or no discussion of the economic systems in play at the timeGiven that the seemingly long established old Assyrian trade networks which involved a merchant class using contracts and some form of banking had been in use in the MBA some 700 years before the time in uestion this is uite a serious omissionSecondly Cline s discussion supposes the longer traditional chronology for the Kingdoms of Israel which or less coincides with late BA collapse c1200BC However I think several other eminent archaeologists Finkelstein et al would still argue for an Iron Age date c600BC for an archaeologically identifiable presence for specifically Jewish religious practice monumentally etc that is on return from Babylonian exileStill a useful read though

REVIEW Ñ eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF Ò mzines.co.uk

In 1177 BC marauding groups known only as the Sea Peoples invaded Egypt The pharaoh’s army and navy managed to defeat them but the victory so weakened Egypt that it soon slid into decline as did most of the surrounding civilizations After centuries of brilliance the civilized world of the Bronze Age came to an abrupt and cataclysmic end Kingdoms fell like dominoes over the course of just a few decades No Minoans or Mycenaeans No Trojans Hittites or Babylonians The thriving economy and cultures of the late second millennium BC whi. It s a good book one that fills in a significant gap that can often be seen in other books on the ancient Bronze Age societies Cline is very very careful to ualify findings which makes a lot of sense but also gives the book a vague indeterminate feel The fact is that we just don t much about what happened and the little we do know is not enough to actually construct a strong narrative on the events that led to all of these civilizations falling apart So at times it led me to wonder why I was actually reading this bookI also find the name to be disingenuous The year is chosen because that is when we know that Ramses III encountered the Sea Peoples in Egypt but Cline spends a significant chunk of the book underplaying the role the Sea Peoples had in Bronze Age Collapse In fact sometimes it feels like he is underplaying the Bronze Age Collapse itself He is uite uick to point out the cities that were re populated that did not suffer as much as first thought and so forth Yet he also doesn t in my opinion spend nearly enough time in Greece as the destruction of the Myceneae civilization is much total than the ones he does focus on Then again though the information we would need to tell that story is just not thereHowever these faults are outweighed by the fact that Cline paints a very very good picture of what civilization was like at the time before the collapse The picture he paints is one of by all accounts a very cosmopolitan dynamic lively society It s where the vast majority of the book spends its time and it s clear that is where Cline s interests lie The problem is that the narrative is set up so that this is merely a prologue to the collapse yet the way the collapse is soft pedaled makes the whole thing feel like a bait switch I would have happily read a book on Late Bronze Age civilization that was sold as such but perhaps the publishers thought selling it as a gripping story of collapse would get attention and they were probably rightI do recommend this book just don t go in expecting what the title and description says

REVIEW .com: 1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed Audible Audio Edition: Eric H. Cline, Andy Caploe, Audible Studios: Books

Ch had stretched from Greece to Egypt and Mesopotamia suddenly ceased to exist along with writing systems technology and monumental architecture But the Sea Peoples alone could not have caused such widespread breakdown How did it happen In this major new account of the causes of this First Dark Ages Eric Cline tells the gripping story of how the end was brought about by multiple interconnected failures ranging from invasion and revolt to earthuakes drought and the cutting of international trade routes Bringing to life the vibrant m. Cline builds up a picture of an interconnected Bronze Age world in the Mediterranean but in the end he effectively dismisses the collapse as somewhat inevitable due to it being a complex system In short Bronze Age Mediterranean societies had reached such a complex degree of interconnectedness that it was easily undone by natural challengesAll in all I thought he completely dodged the bullet and effectively reframed I don t know with systems collapse because which doesn t actually explain anythingSomething I found especially frustrating is that he mentions climate change as a potential cause especially severe drought but then dismisses it as a smoking gun because the region has always seen droughts The big uestion begged is how severe were these droughts by comparisonThe answer according to his own references is that the region experienced the worst period of drought of any period during either the Bronze Age or even Iron Age Well there s a clear cause for the collapse of trade society along with social upheaval and migration On the plus side the book is rich with references for further research