PDF Jada̜c do Babadag download – DOC & Kindle eBook



10 thoughts on “Jada̜c do Babadag

  1. says:

    If this photograph by André Kertész takes hold of your thoughts and your imagination you might understand why Andrzej Stas

  2. says:

    'On the Road to Babadag' won all possible awards in Poland and for a while it was all everybody was reading and talking about So imagine my disappointment when I started reading it and all I wanted to do was to hurl it against the wall It’s because I thought this would be a travel book I thought Stasiuk would

  3. says:

    I would like to be buried in all those places where I've been before and will be again My head among the green hills of Zemplén my heart somewhere in Transylvania my right hand in Chornohora my left in Spišská Belá my sight in Bukovina my sense of smell in Răşinari my thoughts perhaps in this neighborhood This is how I imagine the night when the current roars in the dark and the thaw wipes away the white

  4. says:

    I really don't know how to rate this book Some parts are insanely delightful and poetic this man can write a sentence but in other parts my mind drifted away during some unnecessary ongoing descriptions don't know if that is due to my lack of focus and concentration I did work a lot these days But parts that were good were so original and a

  5. says:

    Seemed like a 10 page essay that became a 250 page book through repetition repetition and repetition This is a po

  6. says:

    A strange little book Since the author jumped around a lot I gave myself permission to read it randomly I was mostly interested in what he experienced in Hungary so I searched out those sections first came across a passage which I will uote in full because it gets to the uirky loveliness of Stasiuk's writing Nothing in Talkibánya a village

  7. says:

    If you enjoy reading about crumbling stucco peeling paintwork places forgotten by time and the outside world the backwaters of Eastern Europe and the Balkans byways hidden by mist melancholia ferries to nowhere drinking in forlorn bars decay the detritus of post communism village suares overgrown with untended trees and sleepy border crossings then this might be the book for you All of these things and others dealt with

  8. says:

    The work wanders the byways to the villages of the provincial peripheral Eastern Europe region giving the true experience of going the

  9. says:

    I would say I finish 95% of the books I start BUt this one didn't make the cut I picked it up because it was about

  10. says:

    In this postmodern travel book the author ruts around eastern Europe divvying out impressions of this and that in prose that is sometimes lyrical but almost always opaue I never could figure out what the point of this book was There was no cohesion to it and it seemed the author was on drugs most of the time I su

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FREE READ ò PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ó Andrzej Stasiuk

Andrzej Stasiuk is a restless and indefatigable traveler His journeys take him from his native Poland to Slovakia Hungary Romania Slovenia Albania Moldova and Ukraine By car train bus ferry To small towns and villages with unfamiliar sounding yet strangely evocative names “The heart of my Europe” Stasiuk tells us “beats in Sokolow Podlaski and in Husi not i If this photograph by Andr Kert sz takes hold of your thoughts and your imagination you might understand why Andrzej Stasiuk writes It s possible that everything I ve written so far began with this photographThe space of this photograph hypnotizes me and all my travelling has had only one purpose to find at long last the secret passage into its interior The strange aspect of this for me is that I who have never been in Eastern Europe since I wrote this I have been to Romania and loved it long to be there too and not just in that street where a blind violin player is led across a dusty road by his young son but in so many of the other photos Kert sz took This one for example I long to be there following on along that shadowy street as the old man returns to his home after perhaps a visit to the nearby bar a drink and cards with other old men who have lived there all their lives That longing and that searching pervades every page of this wonderful book Stasiuk has no interest in events or spectacles or cities with all their aspirations and anxieties In a small Hungarian town called Gonc he watches a Slovak family emerge with some hesitation from a Skoda Octavia and reflects This was the sort of thing we wanted to see not the Hussite House with its curious wooden bed that pulls out like a drawer as the guidebook said What happened on the main street in Gonc was interesting than what had become mere history It drew us because life is made of bits of the present that stay in the mind The world itself really is made of that Of course what he sees and how he sees it is highly subjective He needs to see those elements of rural societies that seem eternal fixed repeated through the generations All as it had been for a thousand years If he finds evidence of change modernity the new universal mediocrity he isn t telling For him it isn t worth noticing What makes Stasiuk s point of view special is that it always emerges by engaging with the ordinary ordinary people ordinary events Nowhere in the book is there the slightest sense of his being patronising of seeing any division between what he is and what anyone else is This is travel writing by someone who wants to be as much as to see Again and again he enters bars that brought the film of Satantango to mind Lonely hopeless places where they ve never heard about the present Clearly I am drawn to decline decay to everything that is not as it could or should be I though too of Bela Tarr s most recent and final film The Turin Horse when I read about The odour of monotonous labour chained for centuries to matterthis changing that changes nothing this movement that expends itself Some spring not only will the snow melt everything else will melt too Does any of this make sense Stasiuk prefers to dream the landscape into words than to describe exactly what is there For him it is important to evoke the essence of a place than to laboriously describe it in detail History impinges there is for example a visit to the grave of Nicolae Ceausescu but it is what remains despite history that sends him on another journey always on the smaller roads through Slovakia Romania Hungary or Albania trying to find the secret passage into their interiors

FREE READ Jada̜c do Babadag

Jada̜c do Babadag

Rushing away the flies above the face of the deceased On to Soroca a baroue Byzantine Tatar Turkish encampment to meet Gypsies And all the way to Babadag between the Baltic Coast and the Black Sea where Stasiuk sees his first minaret “simple and severe a pencil pointed at the sky”  A brilliant tour of Europe’s dark underside travel writing at its very best I would say I finish 95% of the books I start BUt this one didn t make the cut I picked it up because it was about the Balkans and Eastern Europe my favourite places Further the overarching theme the second hand europe that is not really Europe a land that frightens most that is whispered by Westerners with a certain cautionary toneas the place to travel I understand how the writer might have wanted to have written this book in such a confusing manner because we Eastern EUropeans are as confused as this book However I believe that this book at least according to its Romanian cover does not deliver what it promises On the road to Babadag does not make me want to just pick up my backpack and my tent and just set out to know the least traveled to destinations of this Europe my part of Europe but it makes me want to put out the book and if anything try and write one myself Which in the end I guess it is also a productive feeling you can get from a book Maybe the best of them all

FREE READ ò PDF, DOC, TXT or eBook ó Andrzej Stasiuk

N Vienna”  Where did Moldova end and Transylvania begin he wonders as he is being driven at breakneck speed in an ancient Audi loose wires hanging from the dashboard by a driver in shorts and bare feet a cross swinging on his chest In Comrat a funeral procession moves slowly down the main street the open coffin on a pickup truck an old woman dressed in black b A strange little book Since the author jumped around a lot I gave myself permission to read it randomly I was mostly interested in what he experienced in Hungary so I searched out those sections first came across a passage which I will uote in full because it gets to the uirky loveliness of Stasiuk s writing Nothing in Talkib nya a village that hadn t changed in a hundred years Wide scattered houses under fruit trees The walls a sulfurous bilious yellow the wood carving deep brown the door frames sculpted the shutters and verandas enduring in perfect symbiosis with the heavy Baroue abundance of the gardens The metaphor of settling and taking root appeared to have taken shape here in an ideal way Not one new house yet also not one old house in need of repair or renovation Although we were the only foreigners we drew no stares From the stop in the course of the day four buses departed Time melted in the sunlight around noon it grew still In the inn men sat from the morning on and without haste sipped their palinka and beer in turn The bartender immediately knew I was a Slav and said pouring dobre and na zdorovye It was one of those places where you feel the need to stay but have no reason to Everything exactly as it should be and no one raising a voice or making an unnecessarily abrupt movement On a slope above the village the white of a cemetery From windows of homes the smell of stewing onions In market stalls mounds of melons paprikas A woman emerged from a cellar with a glass jug filled with wine But we left Telkib nya eventually because nothing ends a utopia uicker than the desire to hold on to itThe entire book is like this from what I can tell not sure I read it all since I approached it so unsystematically and it made me want to travel the way he does Whimsical receptive his romantic tendencies are leavened with a dark Eastern European sensibility that I found irresistible