Summary [ The Scientist in the Crib What Early Learning Tells Us About the Mind E-pub ] ↠ Alison Gopnik

Alison Gopnik È 8 FREE READ

This exciting book by three pioneers in the new field of cognitive science discusses important discoveries about how much babies and young children know and learn and how much parents naturally teach themIt argues that evolu. This was an interesting book The authors review some interesting research on how infants learn in the first years of life If it weren t for Chapter 5 I would have rated it higher You can skip this chapter if you read the book All this chapter does is repeat the same studies over and over and over again and make this really weird drawn out comparison of babies to computers and scientists that doesn t even make sense half the time

SUMMARY The Scientist in the Crib What Early Learning Tells Us About the Mind

The Scientist in the Crib What Early Learning Tells Us About the Mind

The same methods that allow scientists to learn so much about the world Filled with surprise at every turn this vivid lucid and often funny book gives us a new view of the inner life of children and the mysteries of the min. The Scientist in the Crib What Early Learning Tells Us About the Mind has a great premise that babies are a lot smarter and much cognitively capable than previously thought The three co authors of this book explore and develop this main premise by first introducing the historical assumptions about babies and then contrasting that with research within the field of developmental psychology for infants which started around the 1970s The research as they report consistently paints a picture of very intelligent human beings deciphering the new world around them And the authors do not hide their utter and complete awe of babies Great premise I buy it already I don t need to be convinced of itBut for a book that has scientist in its title and that begins by touting itself as a book about science there is actually very little science presented All conclusions of the research is presented in general terms with zero data as if the conclusions were just accepted as fact with no variation nuance or controversy That isn t science I m not accusing the authors of making up the conclusions or of the facts not being backed up by the appropriate scholarly articles Indeed the notes and references sections are uite extensive But in the text of the book there is no presentation or discussion of the results of experiments For example one of the results presented early on tells us that babies can distinguish their mother s voice and prefer it Well is this universal Is the result that 100% the babies tested turned towards their mother s voice over a stranger What was the sample size Are there competing theories to explain the same behavior Is preference solely determined by heads turning When was this study done What progress has been made since then Is this a generally accepted fact in the field because it has been successfully replicated And that s just the start of my uestionsThe book is organized into 7 chapters Chapter 1 introduces the general premise of the book and introduces the three main problems of babies 1 the problem of Other Minds 2 the problem of the External World ie Things and 3 the problem of Language Then the next three chapters elaborates on each of these topics in turn That gives us a total of 4 chapters Next comes the worst chapter ever Chapter 5 What in the world were the authors thinking in writing this awful chapter And what kind of editor would allow it to remain The chapter repeats the previous chapters and then goes into a bizarre comparison of scientists to babies As in scientists are like babies What No It s absurd It s as if the authors are so enad of babies that they want to force their adult suare pegs into the babies round hole It doesn t work no matter how much you try or desire itThe last two chapters thankfully return to sanity Chapter 6 offers a deeper understanding of the brain how it works and how it gets wired uite interesting And Chapter 7 concludes by touching upon policy implications Reasonable enoughAll in all I can t really say that I recommend this book In addition to all the above problems having been written in 1999 surely the information is dated and new research has cropped up I m glad that the authors are arguing in favor of the awesome cognitive abilities of babies I agree with that But I need a scientific discussion especially for a book that purports to be about science I got statistics out of a potty training book Just a mere how to book reported statistics like the average age of boys and girls being potty trained and average times of how long it took and the percentage of boys and girls potty trained by age 4

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Tion designed us both to teach and learn and that the drive to learn is our most important instinct It also reveals as fascinating insights about our adult capacities and how even young children as well as adults use some of. I really liked this explanation of how babies learn and the scientific experiments that people do to them to determine this It covers how we learn language and that the other person is different from you and one other topic that I ve forgotten The majority of the book was fascinating and made babies so much understandable There s a reason they mimic your gestures There s a reason they can make all kinds of sounds The last chapter was a long winded conclusion which just restated all of the previous interesting information If you have no time just read the last chapter and if you have time read the rest and skip the last chapter


10 thoughts on “The Scientist in the Crib What Early Learning Tells Us About the Mind

  1. says:

    This was an interesting book The authors review some interesting research on how infants learn in the first years of life If it weren't for Chapter 5 I would have rated it higher You can skip this chapter if you read the book All this chapter does is repeat the same studies over and over and over again and make this really weird drawn out comparison of babies to computers and scientists that doesn't even make sense half

  2. says:

    This book is an excellent introduction to understanding child development The authors take the time to remind readers that although babies are individuals Babies have perceptions about the world—they are constantly absorbing information and analyzing and interpreting it to draw their own conclusions The authors take the time to clearly explain the thought process and how they acuire knowledge Plenty of case studies and anecdotal eviden

  3. says:

    My overall impression of this book is a favorable one The information was relevant easily digested and had snippets of humor interjected here and there The resources used to compile this book were extensive and credible T

  4. says:

    This book is so awesome Everyone with a baby should read it the sooner the betterFirst amazing thing is the science The book discusses three main problems that kids have to figure out the Other Minds problem that there are other autonomous peop

  5. says:

    I was sorely disappointed by this book I had heard a lot of people raving about; but when I think about it I don't remember if the raves came from child free people or from parents I thought this would be an important book for me as a parent to read My impression of it however was that it was written by college professors who wanted a light fun superficial yet scientific uick read pseudo textbook to use with their undergrads The examples o

  6. says:

    I really liked this explanation of how babies learn and the scientific experiments that people do to them to determine this It covers how we learn language and that the other person is different from you and one other topic that I've forgotten

  7. says:

    An interesting book about the way children's understanding of the world develops in the first few years and indeed months of life Some fascinating insights for example that very young babies identify objects primarily by their trajectory and even if they change shape or form behind a screen and a tractor comes out as a

  8. says:

    The Scientist in the Crib What Early Learning Tells Us About the Mind has a great premise – that babies are a lot smarter and much cognitively capable than previously thought The three co authors of this book explore and

  9. says:

    Picked this up at the suggestion it could allay future parental fears that we were not providing an enriching hyper structured experience for

  10. says:

    This book is nearly 15 years old and it felt that way to me; having read other books on infant development lately I found it a less in

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